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Posts Tagged ‘suitenro’

8/8

After a rather productive and fun day yesterday, today I decided I needed to try to take it easier. My legs are sore from all that walking, and while I fortunately haven’t gotten sunburned at all (woo!), it’s probably better to give that a bit of a break too.


So, of course, what did I do but start the day by walking around in the hot sun. Went to Tomari, checked out the Foreign Cemetery, which was unfortunately closed. Boo. I asked in one of the shops next door, and he said that people often just hop the admittedly extremely low wall. I was tempted, but if I did hop the fence, then the entire time in the cemetery, I would have been quite visible to absolutely anybody passing by, and the gate was quite clearly closed. So, I decided to pass. I got a good shot of the monument noting the landing of Commodore Perry, and while there may be some individuals from that era buried there, the only graves I could see or read from outside the wall were all from the post-war era. So, I’m not going to bother hopping the fence only to find little or nothing of note…


Instead, I pressed on in hopes of finding Ameku Shrine, one of the Eight Shrines of Ryukyu (as designated as such by the Meiji government, so we can forget about that having any real historical/traditional significance in terms of the Ryukyu Kingdom). I thought this would be as easy as finding the shrines/temples in Onoyama Park. How wrong I was. Instead, I spent the next I don’t know how long traipsing around more or less the full perimeter of Ameku Park and seeing not only no way in, but also no signs mentioning the park or the shrine or pointing the way, at all. As it turns out, as I discovered the following day, the location of Seigen-ji (its associated temple) on Google Maps is mistaken, showing up on the wrong side of the Park (and Ameku Shrine doesn’t show up at all). Google Maps is a wonderful thing, but it cannot always be trusted to be perfectly accurate, so, sometimes it pays to back up your Googling with some more local expertise.


Spent most of the rest of the day at the Prefectural Museum, and shopping. Mostly for books, which was fairly successful, and for kariyushi wear (the Okinawa equivalent of aloha shirts), which was not so successful. I found a few shirts I absolutely fell in love with, but the prices were beyond unreasonable. I’m talking literally in the 10-30,000 yen (US$100-300) range. And when you’re a cheapo like me, who really would rather not spend more than $30 on any article of clothing if I can avoid it, that’s just absurd. Of course, in comparison to those very uniquely Okinawan designs, all the $20-30 shirts, with their very standard aloha patterns, just didn’t appeal any more, at all (if they even had to begin with). Fortunately, I did find one nice shirt, with a shisa pattern, that was extremely reasonably priced, and fits quite well. All my other aloha shirts have strangely developed giant holes in them, so I was in need of replacements… (I feel like I’ve talked about this already… sorry. To let you in on a little secret, these posts were all written out of order, and I’m being lazy and not taking the time to rewrite them based on what else I might have said elsewhere…)

I did make off with tons of books, though, including some bought at the museum, and some – new, full cover price, unfortunately – from various bookstores around town. Lots of good stuff for my research. Now I just need to find the time to read them…

And then, in the evening, I made my way to the Makishi area, which I thought I’d remembered as a good place to get original design T-shirts and such. The one store in particular that I knew of is now gone, which was a shame, but, that’s to be expected, I suppose, after five years; and meanwhile, the area immediately around the station looks quite developed up, with a new public square, with water features and a giant ceramic Shisa, and a new shopping center. It all looks really nice and new and shiny. That said, though, the shopping center itself feels kind of half-empty and sad…

Finally, I grabbed dinner at one of the live houses on Kokusai-dôri. I considered going to one of the numerous places with live sanshin music (folk songs, pop songs, etc.), but decided to change it up and go to the one featuring classical Ryukyu odori (Ryukyuan dance). The show was shorter than I expected, but quite nice, and the decor of the restaurant itself was incredible, with all the walls painted with scenes relating the history of the Ryukyu Kingdom. In fact, one of the header bars which I’ve been using on this site here, which I basically just found on the internet (yeah, I know. sorry!), turns out to be one of the works from the walls of this restaurant. Pretty incredible. And, if you’re interested, all the artworks can be found in a nice paperback book called 「絵で解る 琉球王国 歴史と人物」 (“Understand history and historical figures of the Ryukyu Kingdom through pictures”), available at the restaurant, or indeed at any of the major bookstores in town, or on Amazon, for about 1500 yen.

And that, basically, was my day. Not the most exciting entry this time around, I suppose. In my next entry, I’ll talk about my final day in Okinawa: Shikinaen, and playing catch-up!

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